© 2022 New England Public Media

FCC public inspection files:
WGBYWFCRWNNZWNNUWNNZ-FMWNNI

For assistance accessing our public files, please contact hello@nepm.org or call 413-781-2801.
NEPM Header Banner
PBS. NPR. Local Perspective.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

As war drags on in Ukraine, is it time to talk compromise?

Firefighters extinguish a fire following a Russian bombardment at a park in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, May 3, 2022. (Felipe Dana/AP)
Firefighters extinguish a fire following a Russian bombardment at a park in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, May 3, 2022. (Felipe Dana/AP)

U.S. aid is helping Ukraine in its ongoing battle with Russian invaders.

“It’s extremely important that there is a continued stream of military support coming to Ukraine,” Ivanna Klympush-Tsintsadze says. “We have to survive.”

And that’s not just in Ukraine’s interest.

“Someone who tries to understand what’s in America’s best interest well into the future will pretty quickly conclude that you have to win the war in Ukraine,” Anne Applebaum, a staff writer at The Atlantic, says.

But ongoing conflict comes with a risk.

“What is the U.S. interest commensurate with the possibility of nuclear escalation?” Steven Simon, a fellow at the MIT Center for International Studies, asks. “There really isn’t one.”

Today, On Point: As war drags on, is it time to talk compromise?

Guests

Anne Applebaum, staff writer at The Atlantic. Senior fellow at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. (@anneapplebaum)

Steven Simon, fellow at the MIT Center for International Studies.

Ivanna Klympush-Tsintsadze, a member of the Ukrainian Parliament from the opposition European Solidarity Party. Chair of the Ukrainian Parliament’s committee on integration with the European Union. (@IKlympush)

Related Reading

The Atlantic: “The War Won’t End Until Putin Loses” — “The expression off-ramp has a pleasing physicality, evoking a thing that can be constructed out of concrete and steel.”

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.