John Voci

Sr. Director Radio

John Voci has worked in all areas of public media including radio, TV and digital, since 1977. He joined WGBH Boston in 1981 working in a variety of capacities over thirty-two years. He managed WGBH’s expansion and development of three broadcast services and six radio channels as well as the station’s move to new facilities in 2007. John has produced radio programs for National Public Radio, Public Radio International and WGBH; television projects for WGBH’s Basic Black; and was Technical Director for many of the station’s pioneering digital broadcasts.  He joined NEPR in 2014 and in 2016, launched Media Lab, the station’s youth training initiative. He was also Executive Producer of Words in Transit, the station’s multi-platform series on immigration and for the podcast In Contrast.  He is currently producer of Word Matters, a podcast on the history and etymology of words produced in collaboration with Merriam-Webster.

John is also a certified Project Management Professional specializing in project management for clients in broadcast and digital media.

Ted Lee is founder of Feeding Tube Records, now located in Florence, Massachusetts.
John Voci / NEPM

In a former industrial building in Florence, Massachusetts — near jewelry designers, a T-shirt maker and a school devoted to archery — is Feeding Tube Records, a record store and label specializing in what the owners characterize as “weird music.”

Designer Arnold Skolnick, who lives in western Massachusetts, with the iconic Woodstock festival poster he created in 1969.
John Voci / NEPR

After 50 years, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair is remembered for the crowd of some 450,000, the fields of mud from the intermittent rain, the historic rock 'n' roll performances by musicians that went on to become legends, and the festival’s logo: a white bird perched on a blue and green guitar neck against a red background.

In Contrast Update

Aug 6, 2019

In Contrast will return with a new episode on September 11th with author Andri Snær Magnason. 

In Contrast is taking a summer break this July. Look forward to the next episode released on August 8 with poet Forrest Gander. While you're waiting for the next release, explore some of our past episodes at nepr.net/incontrast

Words in Transit Podcast Helping Others
Beth Reynolds / NEPR

The final episode of this series of "Words in Transit" features stories of immigrants from Bhutan and Slovenia and their work today to help other new arrivals to this country.

Words in Transit Cultural Appreciation
Beth Reynolds / NEPR

A woman from Ghana and a man from the Ivory Coast are grateful for the opportunities they’ve found here, but also feel that we can learn much from their native cultures.

Words in Transit Podcast
Beth Reynolds / NEPR

Educational and professional opportunities brought many to the U.S. On episode 13, we hear stories from a man from Spain and one from Argentina.

An Indian and a Taiwanese woman reflect on life in both their native countries and in their adopted country.

Words in Transit
Beth Reynolds / NEPR

Third Culture Kid features stories of acclimation and loss from a Palestinian woman and an Irish woman.

Words in Transit
Beth Reynolds|Joyce Skowyra / NEPR

The second of two podcasts on immigrants that came to the U.S. without documentation. This episode, features the story of an immigrant from Colombia that came here to improve his family’s financial situation and the story of a young man from the Dominican Republic that realized as a teenager that his family was undocumented. 

Words in Transit
Beth Reynolds / NEPR

Family Reunion features stories of two young people who came to the United States to re-unite with their families. Western New England is home to immigrants and refugees from around the globe, and their presence revitalizes the region and redefines its culture. Their journeys have involved fear, uprootedness, and isolation as well as perseverance, creativity, and hope. New England Public Radio (NEPR), in collaboration with Copeland Colloquium at Amherst College produced Words in Transit, an oral history project collected the personal stories of nearly thirty people who have made this area their new home.

Words in Transit
Beth Reynolds / NEPR

The story of two families, one from Syria and one from Sri Lanka that came to the United States to create new and better lives.

Words in Transit
Beth Reynolds / NEPR

Survival includes two stories from refugees from Burundi and the Congo that escaped violence in their homeland.

Words in Transit
Beth Reynolds / NEPR

We hear an essay on DACA from an undocumented immigrant profiled in episode 2.In this episode, Angelica Merino Monge who came to the U.S. from El Salvador when she was ten years old, shares her story, and how DACA has impacted her life.

Words in Transit
Beth Reynolds / NEPR

Survival includes two stories from refugees from Burundi and the Congo that escaped violence in their homeland.

Beth Reynolds / NEPR

Vira Douangmany Cage and Sovann-Malis Loeung came to the United States as children from south-east Asia-Vira from Laos and Sovann-Malis from Cambodia. Their traumatic journeys and early experiences in a new land continue to impact their lives today.

Beth Reynolds / NEPR

The story of two Iraqi refugees who were granted political asylum to come to the United States.

Beth Reynolds / NEPR

For many immigrants education is important to their transition and future. In episode 3, Heap Sin, from Cambodia, and Woodlyn Joachim, from Haiti, talk about how teachers and education impacted their lives.

Beth Reynolds / NEPR

Stories of two young people that came from El Salvador as children. They talk about their journeys here and the challenges of being undocumented.

Photos by Beth Reynolds / NEPR

John Voci, Executive Director of Programming and Content at New England Public Radio, introduces Words in Transit, a podcast of personal stories of nearly 30 people from around the world who have made their new home in western New England.