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Regional News

'A lot of speculation about a lot of things': Walsh quiet on possible bid for governor

U.S. Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh (at right) speaks in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 13, 2021. U.S. Rep. Richard Neal joined Walsh.
Adam Frenier
/
NEPM
U.S. Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh (at right) speaks in Springfield, Massachusetts, on December 13, 2021. U.S. Rep. Richard Neal joined Walsh.

In a visit to Springfield Monday, U.S. Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh didn't say much about whether he's weighing a run for governor of Massachusetts.

Some published reports have said Walsh, a Democrat and former mayor of Boston, is mulling whether to seek the corner office. That's after Republican Charlie Baker announced recently he's not running for reelection.

During a press conference at Union Station about the federal infrastructure bill, Walsh joked about the rumors.

"There's a lot of speculation about a lot of things, and I'm not speculating on it," he said to laughs.

Then he turned more serious, and said his mind is on his current job as labor secretary.

"I work for a great guy in President Biden. We're laying out a good plan to move forward and my job is focused on being the best secretary I can be for the working people in America," Walsh said.

Should Walsh decide to run for governor, he'd begin with more than $5 million in his state campaign account.

There’s also been plenty of speculation that another political heavyweight, state Attorney General Maura Healey, could also enter the Democratic primary. She's picked up her fundraising pace with at least one event last week and two more planned this week.

Healey, a two-term Democrat, said recently that she would make a decision on her political future "soon."

Though any money Healey raises could also be used for a campaign for reelection, the attorney general is already sitting on a hefty campaign account and faces no known opposition should she decide to seek reelection.

Healey reported having $3.3 million in the bank at the end of the November, which could be used for a run for governor or a third campaign for attorney general.

Of the three declared Democrats in the race, Harvard political science professor Danielle Allen is sitting on the most cash with $386,270 in her account, followed by Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz with $198,311 on hand at the end of November. Former Sen. Ben Downing finished last month with $32,742 in his account.

Reporting from NEPM's Adam Frenier and State House News Service was used in this report.