Regional News

'Keep The Momentum': How Mass. Companies Say They'll Start — And Continue — To Fight Racism

George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis, but his death hit home for Boston Scientific because the company has nearly 9,000 employees in Minnesota. We immediately held listening sessions with our executives, said Desiree Ralls-Morrison, a senior vice president and general counsel for the medical device maker. With or without a link to the Twin Cities, many Massachusetts firms say they are committed to confronting racism — even within their own organizations — after Floyds death...

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Racism

CDC Employees Call Out Agency's 'Toxic Culture Of Racial Aggressions'

Updated 6:15 p.m. ET More than 1,200 current employees at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have signed a letter calling for the federal agency to address "ongoing and recurring acts of racism and discrimination" against Black employees, NPR has learned. In the letter, addressed to CDC Director Robert Redfield and dated June 30, the authors put their call for change in the context of the coronavirus pandemic's disproportionate impact on Black people and the killings of George...

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The Self-Defense Brigade Anti-Oppression Rally for George Floyd, at the Keney Park Woodland entrance in Hartford, Connecticut, on June 1, 2020.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public / NENC

After more than a month of protests against racial injustice by police and the killing of George Floyd, some police departments are considering revising their policies on use of force. 

Thirty-two residential schools that serve students with the most severe disabilities will receive much-needed aid from the state.

This spring, as other schools in Massachusetts closed their doors and moved instruction online, those schools stayed open — exposing students and staff to the virus and incurring millions in unmet costs. And even with this support, the risk isn’t over.

Clauses in police union contracts often protect officers from the consequences of their misconduct. That’s according to a new analysis from the ACLU of Connecticut.

Connecticut’s Department of Education says that state COVID-19 data will guide the decision-making process regarding how K-12 students should learn in the fall, but Thursday's numbers inched in the wrong direction:  The state reported 101 new positive COVID-19 test results and an uptick in the number of hospitalizations by two.

Many colleges plan to resume in-person learning in the fall. Others, including prestigious schools like Harvard, are going all online. In the midst of a pandemic, returning to dorms or even a classroom is a hard choice to make for some students and professors.

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Politics

Roger Stone Clemency Latest Example Of Trump Rewarding His Friends, Scholars Say

President Trump issued his first pardon in August 2017, just about seven months into his presidency. Three years and three dozen clemencies later, some patterns have emerged. One clear pattern is Trump's tendency to grant clemency to prominent political figures and people who have shown loyalty to him, clemency scholars say. That propensity was on full display on Friday, as Trump commuted the sentence of his former campaign adviser Roger Stone. Stone was just days away from beginning a 40...

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Disease

Coronavirus FAQ: How Do I Protect Myself If The Coronavirus Can Linger In The Air?

I'm hearing a lot of talk about the coronavirus spreading through aerosols — is wearing a mask in a grocery store enough protection? What else should I do to stay safe? Quick answer first: Going to the grocery store where you and everyone else is wearing a mask and keeping a distance from each other is still considered a low-risk activity. Go get your summer strawberries! For background, aerosols are tiny microdroplets containing the virus that can be expelled when we talk or breathe and can...

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Summer Fiction Series

Author Jennifer Rosner of Northampton, Massachusetts.
Elizabeth Solaka / Courtesy Jennifer Rosner

True Stories Of Ingenuity Hiding Children In Wartime Inspired 'The Yellow Bird Sings'

Kicking off our annual summer ficiton series: a novel about a mother-daughter connection and the role of creativity and beauty in human survival.

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NEPM Now

Our Commitment: Civil Dialogue, Context and Conversation

We are deeply saddened by the tragic events of the last several weeks which have shaken the Black community. The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and too many other Black Americans have triggered national and international outrage and calls for systemic change. We once again see the bitter truths about racism, inequality, and injustice. This is a difficult time in our Nation’s history. Unlike many countries around the world which have experienced similar horrific...

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More News

Springfield Police Commissioner Cheryl Clapprood.
Greg Saulmon / The Republican / masslive.com/photos

Springfield Officials React To Scathing Report On Excessive Force

Springfield, Massachusetts, city and police officials have responded to a scathing government report that charges the narcotics bureau with a pattern of excessive force with no accountability.

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