© 2022 New England Public Media

FCC public inspection files:
WGBYWFCRWNNZWNNUWNNZ-FMWNNI

For assistance accessing our public files, please contact hello@nepm.org or call 413-781-2801.
NEPM Header Banner
PBS. NPR. Local Perspective.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Corrections

Corrections from New England Public Media.

All the locally produced stories on New England Public Media radio and television platforms and seen on nepm.org must go through our strict editorial process. Occasionally, we make mistakes. If you think you spotted one, email us.

Below is the list of our corrections beginning in May 2015. Some date back to our NEPR archives when we began documenting them.

Much of the news coverage you hear on our frequencies and found on our website is produced by NPR. We carry the network’s programming, but are not involved in its editorial process. You can contact NPR and see a list of its corrections at NPR.org.

    2022
    2021
    2020
    2019
    2018
    2017
    2016
    2015
    2022
    • Due to an editing error an earlier version of a story that first aired on All Things Considered on Nov. 9, 2022, listed the incorrect timeline for undocumented immigrants to apply for driver's licenses in Massachusetts. The correct start date is July 2023.
    • An earlier version of a story published on Oct. 11, 20222, identified the wrong century in relation to some of the designs and the colors that the Lakota used in various objects. The correct time period is the nineteenth century.
    • Due to an editing error, a story published October, 6, 2022, associated a grant with the incorrect state department.
    • Due to an editing error, a story published September 15, 2022, mistakenly included quotation marks around a paraphrase of the Smith College mission statement.
    • The name of Clark University historian Ousmane Power-Greene was incorrectly written on second reference in a story published on Aug. 19, 2022.
    • A story that first aired on All Things Considered on Aug. 15, 2020, incorrectly stated the number of votes cast in favor of raising MCAS scores. The correct vote was 8-3 in favor of the increase.
    • During two Morning Edition sportscasts on July 5, 2022, we incorrectly said the Red Sox victory over the Rays the day before was Boston's eighth consecutive win. It was only the second win in a row for the Sox. It was, however, the team's eighth consecutive Fourth of July victory.
    • Due to a typo, the headline of a story published on June 10, 2022, incorrectly stated that Hampshire County's COVID-19 vaccination rates lagged those of other western Massachusetts counties. It should have said Hampden County.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on June 7, 2022, incorrectly stated some provisions of a bylaw passed by Town Meeting in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.
    • A story that aired during Morning Edition on June 1, 2022, said orphaned bear cubs were fed Gerber baby cereal made with lamb's milk. It should have said milk replacers, including one made for lambs.
    • A story that aired during Morning Edition on May 31, 2022, incorrectly spelled Saida Agostini’s last name. It also incorrectly conflated the timeline of two groups of writers started by Nicole Young-Martin.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on May 24, 2022, listed an incorrect agency as having presented the Massachusetts Counselor of the Year Award to Tama Lang. The award was presented by the Massachusetts School Counselors Association.
    • A story that first aired in Morning Edition on May 11, 2022, incorrectly identified Amilcar Shabazz as the director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at UMass. Shabazz is a professor in the department.
    • Due to a transcription error, a story that first aired during All Things Considered on May 4, 2022, contained an incorrect paraphrase, attributed to Shaleen Title, a former member of the Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on April 27, 2022, incorrectly stated that Pittsfield Police Officer Nicholas Sondrini employed his Taser twice on Miguel Estrella before Sondrini shot Estrella twice with a firearm, killing him. A report from the Pittsfield Police described Sondrini as using his Taser once. Another officer, Christopher Coffey, employed his Taser twice, according to the report.
    • A story published April 5, 2022, misspelled the last name of the director of ServiceNet's early intervention program, Prity Shah.
    • A story published March 22, 2022, misspelled the last name of the president of Congregation Beth Israel, Sandra Berinstein.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on April 1, 2022, incorrectly identified Karen Woods as a faculty member at Bay Path University. She is the university's assistant vice president in the communications department.
    • A story published March 28, 2022, misspelled the Brien Center.
    • A story published March 19, 2022, inaccurately stated the last name of Deb Markowitz due to a production error.
    • A story that aired during Morning Edition on March 11, 2022, incorrectly paraphrased John McCarthy, a school bus contractor. The story said McCarthy's buses drive 1,000 miles a day, when it should have said his buses burn 1,000 gallons of fuel a day.
    • Due to an editing error, a story published on February 9, 2022, incorrectly identified Isaac Mass as a Greenfield city councilor. Mass is a former councilor.
    • A news item read on air during Weekend Edition Sunday on January 2, 2022, stated that the state of Massachusetts distributed thousands of COVID-19 rapid test kits to school districts. Distribution for the kits had begun, but was not yet complete.
    2021
    • Due to a production error, the initial web version of a story published on December 16, 2021, inadvertently omitted the Franklin County full vaccination rate. The statistic is now included.
    • A story published on December 1, 2021, reported the incorrect date for Marty Nathan's death in a caption. The reference has been removed.
    • One airing of a story during All Things Considered, on November 12, 2021, stated the incorrect number of defendants still facing prosecution on charges related to a 2015 fight outside Nathan Bill's bar in Springfield, Massachusetts. According to the Massachusetts Attorney General's office, there are 10 remaining defendants.
    • During a segment of And Another Thing on November 9, 2021, guest Jesse Guerrero's organization was misidentified. Guerrero is with the Metropolitan Planning Council. That same episode included out-of-date data regarding overdue rent obligations in Massachusetts and Connecticut. According to the most recent number from the National Equity Atlas, 106,000 Massachusetts households and 59,000 Connecticut households are behind on rent payments
    • A story that aired during All Things Considered on November 2, 2021, incorrectly said more than half of the population of Holyoke, Massachusetts, is of Puerto Rican descent. According to the most recent Census data for Hispanic or Latino origin, from 2019, just under 50% of the city's population identifies as of Puerto Rican descent. As a whole, Holyoke's Hispanic or Latino population exceeds 50%.
    • A story published on October 27, 2021, included the original deadline for ballots to be received in an election for leaders of the United Auto Workers. The deadline was extended to November 29.
    • During a segment of And Another Thing on October 14, 2021, the second-largest health insurer in Massachusetts was incorrectly identified as Point Health 32. The company created by the merger of Tufts Health Plan and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care is actually called Point32Health. In that same episode, the Tufts Health Medicare replacement plan was incorrectly referred to as the Tufts Preferred Stride program. It is actually Tufts Preferred HMO. Harvard Pilgrim is eliminating its replacement plan called Stride (HMO) Medicare Advantage.
    • A segment of And Another Thing on October 11, 2021, incorrectly estimated the number of indigenous people in western Massachusetts to be 3,500. Census data put the estimated number of people classified as American Indians, Alaskan Natives, Native Hawaiians or Pacific Islanders in Hampden, Hampshire, Franklin and Berkshire Counties as of 2019 at about 6,300.
    • Due to an editing error, a segment of And Another Thing on September 29, 2021, incorrectly identified Springfield School Committee Member Denise Hurst as a longtime resident of Providence. Hurst was later correctly identified as a resident of Springfield.
    • A story published on October 12, 2021, misspelled Massachusetts State Rep. Bud Williams' name in a caption. It has been corrected.
    • A story that aired on Morning Edition on October 1, 2021, incorrectly stated that the Taliban took control of Kabul in 1992. In fact, it was the mujahideen who took control of Kabul in 1992. Later, some of these fighters would form the Taliban. Also, Freshta Abedi's family fled to Pakistan in 1992, not 1993 as originally stated.
    • An early version of a story published on August 19, 2021, incorrectly described Attorney General Maura Healey's vaccine policy for her staff. Healey is not allowing a weekly COVID-19 testing option as an alternative to vaccination, but will require employees with approved exemptions or accommodations to wear masks and take weekly tests.
    • A story that aired in Morning Edition on August 12, 2021, incorrectly stated the concert series formerly known as "Transperformance" began in 1990. It was 1991.
    • A segment of And Another Thing on June 24, 2021, misidentified data from a survey. It should have said 47% of "surveyed" families reported food insecurity in the past year, instead of Massachusetts families. In that same episode, the Vermont Legislature and state Rep. Hal Colston were misidentified as the Vermont Congress and congressman.
    • A segment of And Another Thing on June 21, 2021, incorrectly implied that, if elected, Democratic candidate Danielle Allen would be the first Black governor of Massachusetts. She would be the first Black female governor of Massachusetts. That same episode incorrectly stated that Allen would be the first woman to hold the office of Massachusetts governor. She would be the first woman elected to the office.
    • A story heard on All Things Considered June 10, 2021, referenced the John Dewey Academy. A reporting error located the school in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. It is in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. 
    • Due to an editing error, a story published June 2, 2021, incorrectly said Springfield Catholic Bishop William Byrne made comments on Tuesday about an updated list of clergy credibly accused of abuse. Byrne made his comments on Wednesday.
    • A segment of And Another Thing on June 1, 2021, incorrectly identified the former governor of Massachusetts as Patrick Deval. The former governor’s name is Deval Patrick.
    • Two sportscasts that aired during Morning Edition on Tuesday, May 11, 2021, incorrectly described a hockey game between the Boston Bruins and the Washington Capitals as a playoff game. The game Tuesday evening is the final game of the regular season, not a playoff game.
    • A segment of And Another Thing on April 29, 2021, incorrectly stated that nearly 1.5 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccines have been administered in Massachusetts. The actual number of doses administered in Massachusetts is roughly 6 million.
    • A segment of And Another Thing on April 26, 2021, incorrectly stated that the Eastern States Exposition in West Springfield was hosting the first mass vaccination site in western Massachusetts. The site is operated by a regional collaborative, and is not considered a mass vaccination site. A state-run mass vaccination site opened in Eastfield Mall in Springfield in January.
    • Due to a typo, a version of a story that aired once during All Things Considered on March 8, 2021, incorrectly stated that federal COVID-19 relief legislation would cost $1.9 billion. It should have said $1.9 trillion.
    • A story published February 26, 2021, incorrectly stated the number of reporters at the Daily Hampshire Gazette. It has seven reporters, according to a member of management who did not wish to be identified. Our original report on-air and online incorrectly stated the number as four, but it does not include three reporters who are either on leave or covering arts and sports. 
    • Due to a typo, a story published February 10, 2021, included an incorrect spelling of Mark Melnik's last name.
    • A story published February 1, 2021, incorrectly stated that Ephraim Williams Jr., claimed land that the Stockbridge Mohicans said had been taken from them. The land was claimed by his father, Ephraim Williams Sr. It also incorrectly stated Elijah Williams was the son of Ephraim Williams Jr., but Elijah was his brother. The headline incorrectly stated the college’s "namesake" is a source of pain to the tribe, but it was the Williams family name that is the source of pain.
    • A story published January 11, 2021, incorrectly stated that the Stockbridge-Munsee homelands stretched to northern Vermont. According to the tribe, the homelands in Vermont extend to about 20 miles south of Burlington.
    • A story published January 21, 2021, contained incorrect information about when national tours of Broadway shows would return to the Bushnell Performing Arts Center in Hartford. The Bushnell said it plans to resume the programming toward the end of 2021, although no dates have been publicly announced.
    2020
    • A story published November 16, 2020, incorrectly stated the time by which many businesses must close in Massachusetts under new COVID-19 restrictions. It should have said 10:00 p.m.
    • A story published on November 2, 2020, incorrectly spelled Liz Walber's name and misattributed Kiyoshi Koh's quote to Celina della Croce.
    • A story published on September 22, 2020, incorrectly characterized some comments from Springfield, Mass., guidance counselor Falynne Correia. Correia said she does not know of any of her students who are dealing directly with hunger, although she said she's aware it's a challenge faced by the school district. She also said only some — as opposed to "many" — of her students are at risk of falling behind academically during remote learning.
    • A story published on August 28, 2020, misstated the date by which laid-off MGM employees must be rehired in order to retain their seniority. The correct date is Dec. 31, 2021.
    • A story published on August 21, 2020, misspelled the last name of Daniel Thiombiano, a teacher at Holyoke High School. It's been corrected.
    • A story published on August 19, 2020, misstated the name of Matthew Scott, vice president of student affairs at American International College. It's been corrected.
    • Relying on a search of the UMass online course catalog, a story published on August 8, 2020,  incorrectly stated that Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse most recently taught a course in the spring of 2018, and Congressman Richard Neal in the spring of 2019. A statement from the university said Morse and Neal both taught their courses during more recent semesters.
    • A story published on August 5, 2020, misidentified a person in a photo as Mary Owens Lindenschmid. It has since been removed.
    • A story that first aired in Morning Edition on July 20, 2020, incorrectly located The Hartsbrook School in Amherst, Massachusetts. The school is in Hadley, Massachusetts.
    • A story that first aired in Morning Edition on April 28, 2020, incorrectly stated that UMass Amherst's 2020 commencement had been rescheduled for early fall. UMass' Nancy Buffone said the event will be rescheduled "as public health guidance allows."
    • A story published on March 25, 2020, included an incorrect number for students of color in Northampton, Mass. The correct number is 29%. The error was not repeated in the audio version.
    • The headline of a story published April 6, 2020, said Massachusetts was 1,100 ventilators short of the governor's request. That number should have been 1,300.
    • Due to a production error, an earlier version of a story published on April 1, 2020, misstated the number of Soldiers' Home staff that had been tested for COVID-19.
    • Two stories published on February 26 and March 3, 2020, incorrectly spelled Croix Paquette's first name.
    • A story published February 10, 2020, incorrectly spelled Clare Lahey's name in a caption.
    • Due to an editing error, a story published February 6, 2020, included an incorrect first name for John Bickerman, the mediator tasked with working on the Housatonic River cleanup plan.
    • The introductory language to this interview, which was published on January 31, 2020, incorrectly stated that Bob Steele was born and raised in California. He lived in California before moving to Hartford, but was born and raised in Kansas City.
    • A story published January 17, 2020, included an error in a photo caption. The caption for the portrait of Elizabeth Freeman incorrectly identified the painter as a descendant of Theodore Sedgwick, Elizabeth Freeman's lawyer. The painter married into the Sedgwick family.
    • In a newscast on January 17, 2020, we said both the Boston Bruins and Celtics had lost the night before. The Celtics did lose, but the Bruins beat the Pittsburgh Penguins 4-1.
    • A story published January 17, 2020, misspelled Shannon Liss-Riordan's name in the headline. It's been corrected.
    • In an interview posted January 14, 2020, Boston Globe reporter David Abel called Springfield, Holyoke and Westfield "the largest communities in western Massachusetts." While those are among the largest cities, Chicopee and Pittsfield both have larger populations than Westfield.
    • The audio attached to a story posted January 18, 2019, included the incorrect date for the celebration that year of Martin Luther King Jr.'s birth. It should have said January 21. This was the result of a production error.
    • A story that aired in All Things Considered on January 3, 2020, incorrectly referenced the Springfield "Archdiocese." It is actually a diocese.
    2019
    • A story published November 6, 2019, included typos in references to attorney Peter Alexander Slepchuk and a former Springfield police officer, Steven Vigneault. 
    • A radio story that aired in Morning Edition on November 5, 2019, and posted to our website, incorrectly said there were roughly 5,000 votes cast in the Westfield, Mass., mayoral race. The correct number is about 10,000.
    • A story published October 31, 2019, included a chart with results from recent Springfield, Mass., mayoral elections. In the 2007 tab, we accidentally transposed the candidates' vote percentages.
    • A story that first aired during Morning Edition on September 30, 2019, incorrectly stated that the researchers who conducted a casino impact study are part of UMass Amherst. In fact, the researchers are with the Donahue Institute, which is located in Hadley and is part of the UMass system, but not the Amherst campus.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on September 24, 2019, incorrectly said Daniel Ellsberg "is giving" his papers to UMass Amherst, and the web story's headline said Ellsberg "donated" the papers. In fact, UMass purchased the collection for $2.2 million. The error was also included in a photo caption.
    • A version of an election preview story that aired during Morning Edition on September 16, 2019, contained incorrect polling place hours in Pittsfield and Chicopee. On September 17, Pittsfield's polls are open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., while Chicopee's are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on September 3, 2019, contained the wrong fist name for Eric Halloran, a resident of Colrain, Massachusetts.
    • Photo captions in a story published August 12, 2019, contained the wrong first name for Arnold Skolnick.
    • A story published August 7, 2019, incorrectly spelled "Annelies," the title of the novel discussed, and the full first name of Anne Frank.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on July 24, 2019, incorrectly listed Amherst as one of the train stops on an expanded rail line. It should have said Northampton. The story also said there would be four additional round trips per day. The correct number is two.
    • A story published July 15, 2019, incorrectly stated MGM Springfield's lowest revenue-generating month as December. It should have said January. 
    • A story published July 7, 2019, incorrectly said Miriam Nelson served as Hampshire College's president for just over eight months. It was actually a little more than nine months.
    • A story that aired during All Things Considered on July 1, 2019, incorrectly attributed a quote to Mass. state Rep. Carlos Gonzalez that should have been attributed to Mass. state Sen. Eric Lesser.
    • A story that was published on June 24, 2019, erroneously referred to an "Aunt Dotty" of filmmaker Kent Jones. Dottie is the name of a character in his film, "Diane."
    • A story that was published on May 1, 2019, originally misspelled the name of Devon Greyson.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on April 30, 2019, incorrectly said the overall number of incidents in Massachusetts was down 19 percent from 2018, when it should have said 2017. This was corrected for subsequent airings of the report.
    • In a story that aired during Morning Edition on April 29. 2019, NEPR incorrectly said a new train service should begin by "last summer." This was the result of a typo in the radio script. It should have said late summer.
    • In a story that aired during All Things Considered on March 29, 2019, NEPR incorrectly said sound from a performance rehearsal was recorded at the VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont. The rehearsal actually took place at Northern Stage.
    • A photo in a story published on March 18, 2019, was initially incorrectly attributed. The correct photographer of Darby Dyar is Aaron Haesaert, not Keely Savoie Sexton.
    • The initial radio version of a story that aired during Morning Edition on March 11, 2019, incorrectly said the Big Y store in Adams, Massachusetts, closed "this week." It should have said last week.
    • A story published on February 14, 2019, incorrectly said that Hampshire College would begin notifying "faculty" about layoffs on Tuesday, February 19, when it should have said "staff." The college said it has not yet made a decision about faculty layoffs.
    • The initial radio version of a story that aired on January 22, 2019, said former Massachusetts Senate President Stan Rosenberg spent about $119,000 in political money between his resignation and the end of 2018. That number double-counted some credit card transactions, and also included refunds of campaign donations. A closer estimation for Rosenberg's spending is about $100,000.
    • A story published on January 7, 2019, had incorrect data that has been corrected. The Mass Cultural Council originally told NEPR that about 220,000 people receiving food stamps or cash assistance used their EBT cards through the first year of the Card to Culture program. The correct number is about 173,000.
    • A story published on January 7, 2019, incorrectly indicated that there are "thousands" of federal workers in western Massachusetts working for the Department of the Interior impacted by the shutdown. Reports say there are fewer than 2,000.
    2018
    • A story published on December 6, 2018, originally had an incorrect attribution for a flying eagle photo.
    • A story published on November 15, 2018, inaccurately said Steven Wise and his organization want to send three elephants to a sanctuary in Tennessee. The sanctuary is in California.
    • A story published on November 13, 2018, incorrectly spelled Dusty Christensen's name.
    • A story published on November 6, 2018, incorrectly stated the year of incorporation for Williamsburg, Massachusetts. It was 1771.
    • A story that aired during Morning Edition on November 5, 2018, incorrectly said that Hampden County Register of Deeds Donald Ashe died in June. It was July 10.
    • A story published on September 5, 2018, is about the 1st Congressional District, not the 2nd as an incorrect earlier headline indicated.
    • A story that first aired during Morning Edition on September 25, 2018, incorrectly said there are currently two senators from New England on the Judiciary Committee. There are three.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on August 22, 2018, initially and incorrectly identified a Massachusetts Gaming Commission meeting as a GameSense training.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on August 10, 2018, initially and incorrectly attributed Yokun Ridge in the Berkshires as a "popular spot for hikers, runners and mountain bikers." The popular spot is Kennedy Park in Lenox. Also, Yokun Ride is land Mass Aubudon is getting from Lenox, not vice versa.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on August 9, 2018, inaccurately stated the number of GOP challengers facing Vermont Governor Phil Scott in this year's primary. It's one challenger, not two.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on July 26, 2018, incorrectly identified the location of Springfield's Harambee Festival. The location is William DeBerry School.
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on July 4, 2018, identified Leslie Ferrin's gallery by its former name.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on June 28, 2018, said retiring Berkshire Museum Director Van Shields was 82 years old. This relied on incorrect information from a museum spokesperson, who later said Shields is 68 years old.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on June 5, 2018, misspelled the name of Nashali Pagan.
    • In a story that aired during Morning Edition on June 1, 2018, we made a mistake with part of an interview subject's name. Her full name is Mayrangelique Rojas De Leon.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on May 14, 2018, incorrectly stated that Secretary of State William Galvin had been accused of doing political work on state time. The allegations, however, involve Galvin's staff -- not the secretary himself. The radio version of this interview did not contain the error.
    • A story that aired during Morning Edition on May 4, 2018, said Massachusetts state Senate candidate Chelsea Kline worked at Bay Path College. The school's name became Bay Path University in 2014.
    • story on Monday, April 30, 2018, included an incorrect name for the Connecticut Fund for the Environment. It is not the Connecticut Environmental Fund.
    • A story broadcast during All Things Considered on Monday, March 26, 2018, incorrectly referred to Thomas Aquinas College as Saint Thomas Aquinas College.
    • The web and All Things Considered broadcast version of a story on Thursday, March 22, 2018, incorrectly called the Springfield, Massachusetts, Catholic church organization an archdiocese. It is a diocese.
    • The broadcast version of a story said Greenfield Commonwealth Virtual School is the only online public school in Massachusetts. It was the first, but in 2014, a second school opened.
    • A story included the incorrect title for Christina Swaidan at Westfield State University. She is the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, not the Dean of Students.
    • A story incorrectly stated the date the Montague Select Board announcement that Chip Dodge and the town agreed he'd leave the job of police chief. The correct date was March 5, 2018.
    • A story included a portrait of a person a Cincinnati Art Museum donor says is Samuel T. Bowles, 1797-1851. While Samuel Bowles II lived the same years, the portrait is not verified as the same person, so it's been removed.
    • During a Morning Edition sportscast on Monday, February 5, 2018, we incorrectly said the Boston Celtics lost the day before to Portland 97 to 96. Thanks to a buzzer-beater from Al Horford, the Celtics actually won that game.
    • An interview that aired during Morning Edition on Tuesday, January 30, 2018, incorrectly said the Boston Globe had found 70 examples of fraud, diversion of assets and other losses at charities in Massachusetts over the past seven years. We should have said that number represents all of New England.
    • A story that aired during Morning Edition on Friday, January 26, 2018, incorrectly referenced comments made by Group Insurance Commission Executive Director Roberta Herman "today." We should have said "yesterday."
    • A story that aired during Morning Edition on Thursday, January 25, 2018, incorrectly stated that new research on lobster conservation techniques was published "today." We should have said "this week."
    2017
    • A story that first aired during All Things Considered on Tuesday, December 12, 2017, incorrectly referenced Humane Society of America. It should have said Human Society of the United States.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on December 11, 2017, incorrectly said the dirt roads in Sandisfield, Mass., would be plowed by private contractors. In fact, those roads will be handled by a combination of contractors, town employees and residents.
    • A story that aired during Morning Edition on November 6, 2017, incorrectly said there were roughly 200,000 dams and culverts in the Northeast that no longer serve a purpose. In fact, the FWS said those structures -- the majority of which are culverts -- no longer serve their "original" purpose. While many of the culverts need to be replaced or made larger, they still serve the purpose of allowing a stream to flow under a roadway.
    • A story that first aired during Morning Edition on October 31, 2017, incorrectly said Anthony Benedetti was glad Massachusetts' chief justice called on the legislature to raise the hourly rate for attorneys. Benedetti did not say that specifically, but did say the rate needs to be addressed.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on October 24, 2017, attributed a comment to a Springfield school district spokesperson. It was a Worcester school district spokesperson.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on October 23, 2017, included an incorrect spelling of Gina-Louise Sciarra's name.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on September 4, 2017, misstated the number of people in New England who received a deferral under DACA. The "nearly 35,000" number we originally used includes renewals for the program, so some people were counted twice or more. The correct number is about 15,000, which is the total number of individuals to use a New England address on their initial application.
    • A story that aired during Morning Edition on August 18, 2017, did not include the full name of the author Crystal Senter-Brown.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on August 11, 2017, included an incorrect first name for David Narkewicz, the mayor of Northampton, Mass. 
    • A story read during Morning Edition on July 31, 2017, mistakenly said the Red Sox recently ended a 9-game winning streak. That streak actually belonged to the Kansas City Royals.
    • A story read during Morning Edition on July 12, 2017, said Red Sox player Mookie Betts doubled and scored during the All-Star Game. This was the result of an Associated Press error. Betts was actually hitless, and the AP confused him with Jonathan Schoop of the Baltimore Orioles.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on May 10, 2017, included an incorrect spelling of UMass doctoral candidate Alexandra Purdue-Smithe's last name.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on April 4, 2017, included an incorrect spelling of Lord Jeffery Amherst's first name.
    • A story that aired on Morning Edition on April 4, 2017, incorrectly reported the cap on refunds on produce purchases by SNAP recipients. The refund caps range from $40 to $80 per household, instead of $20 to $80.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on Thursday, March 2, 2017, included an incorrect spelling for Oplontis.
    2016
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on Monday, December 26, 2016, said MeHI “oversees health technology in” Massachusetts, which overstated the quasi-state agency’s charge. We also changed the story to clarify which agency is responsible for issuing the regulations.
    • A story that first aired on Thursday, December 15, 2016, incorrectly identified Martin Pion as Rev. Martin Pion.
    • During a local newscast in Morning Edition on December 8, 2016, we stated that UConn women’s basketball beat “top-ranked” Notre Dame. Notre Dame was actually ranked number 2 at the time, while UConn was ranked number 1.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on December 5, 2016, incorrectly listed Holyoke as using — or planning to use — the crimereports.com platform.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on October 24, 2016, included an incorrect spelling for Dan Kubick’s last name.
    • During local newscasts in Morning Edition on October 17, 2016, we incorrectly said a story about alleged abuse by 12 Springfield police officers was published in The Republican newspaper on Sunday. It was posted to MassLive on Sunday, but did not appear in print until Monday.
    • A story that first aired October 10, 2016, contained a confusing typo. Charter school supporters — not opponents — have raised more than $15 million.
    • A story that first aired September 15, 2016, incorrectly said the late James Bickford was parent to four girls. We should have said three girls and one boy.
    • During local newscasts in Morning Edition on September 12, 2016, we ran a story from the Associated Press about a fatal motorcycle accident that incorrectly identified the deceased. The story should have identified the victim as James Bickford of Holyoke,
    • During a local newscast in All Things Considered on September 2, 2016, we incorrectly ran a story that was scheduled to air two days later. As such, the story said, “Earlier this morning, Mother Teresa officially become a saint,” when that had not yet occurred.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on August 22, 2016, included an incorrect spelling for Madama Butterfly.
    • A story that first aired August 6, 2016, incorrectly identified the location of the interview as an historic “meetinghouse.” It was a tavern.
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on August 4, 2016, included the incorrect date for the qualification round for rhythmic gymnastics at the Rio Olympics.
    • During a local newscast at the beginning of Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me! on July 23, 2016, we incorrectly stated that the Democratic National Convention would be held in Pittsburgh. We should have said Philadelphia.
    • During a local newscast in All Things Considered on May 30, 2016, we read a story from the Associated Press that incorrectly said three people died in Springfield as a result of the tornado on June 1, 2011. The deaths were not in Springfield.
    • A story posted posted to NEPR.net on May 20, 2016, stated the incorrect location of the Hinton State Laboratory.
    • During a local newscast in All Things Considered on May 18, 2016, we mistakenly said a surtax on personal income above a million dollars passed a joint session of the Massachusetts legislature with 102 votes. The correct number was 135.
    • A story that first aired May 3, 2016, stated the wrong location for the Grafton health network. It is based in Virginia, not West Virginia.
    • During a local newscast in All Things Considered on May 2, 2016, we mistakenly said former Patriots tackle Ron Brace III died “last week.” We should have said “last month.”
    • A story that first aired April 20, 2016, misrepresented the amount Northampton is requesting from Smith College under their PILOT program this year. It is $122,929. The story also incorrectly stated that Smith is paying in excess of what the city is requesting through a non-PILOT gift. Smith is paying the city $100,000. The web story has also been updated to include additional payments from UMass Amherst not reflected in the original version.
    • A story that first aired March 24, 2016, misidentified the interim CEO of the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center as Steve Pick. His last name is Pike.
    • During a local newscast in Morning Edition on March 17, 2016, we mistakenly said charter school opponents launched a public campaign “today.” We should have said “yesterday.”
    • During a local newscast in Morning Edition on March 16, 2016, we mistakenly said the Holy Cross men’s basketball team was playing an NCAA tournament play-in game “tomorrow evening.” We should have said “tonight.”
    • A story that first aired February 2, 2016, incorrectly stated that Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy was proposing a new two-year budget. He is, in fact, proposing changes for the second year of the budget which began last year.
    2015
    • A story we first aired on December 15, 2015, noted “misconduct allegations against a jazz host” at WMUA. That host actually described his show’s music as “contemporary classical and experimental.”
    • A story posted to NEPR.net on December 8, 2015, included an incorrect spelling of Mark Melnik’s last name.
    • During a local newscast in Morning Edition on November 24, 2015, we mistakenly said the Paris terror attacks occurred “last week.” We should have said “eleven days ago.”
    • In a story that first aired on October 21, 2015, we misidentified Patrick Archbald as the Interim Deputy Police Chief at UMass Amherst. That was based on our interview with Archbald, who is, in fact, Interim Police Chief.
    • During a local newscast in Morning Edition on October 6, 2015, we mistakenly said Connecticut U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal unveiled a refugee processing proposal “today.” We should have said “yesterday.”
    • A story posted on NEPR.net on September 25, 2015, included an error in the headline. The performer’s first name is Bryce.
    • During a local newscast in Morning Edition on September 25, 2015, we read a story that incorrectly stated that Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, feeling dehydrated, was helped off the stage following a speech at UMass Amherst. That story came to us from the Associated Press, which later issued a correction. The wire service noted that Yellen walked off the stage without assistance.
    • The web version of this story from September 22, 2015, included an incorrect spelling of poet Amy Dryansky’s last name.
    • A story that aired on September 15, 2015, in Morning Edition about a play premiering at the Hartford Stage included the wrong title for that play. “An Opening In Time” is the correct title.
    • A story that aired on August 31, 2015, and posted on NEPR.net that same day, said the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission would “likely” extend a public comment deadline. But the agency had already extended the deadline on the Friday before.
    • A story posted on NEPR.net on August 31, 2015, included an incorrect spelling for attorney Benjamin Keehn’s last name.
    • The headline on a story from August 17, 2015, about a new drug trafficking law requested by Mass. Attorney General Maura Healey, mistakenly said “tracking” instead of “trafficking.”
    • A story from August 5, 2015, incorrectly described a ballot question proposal in Massachusetts. The story said the proposal would increase taxes by four percent for people who make more than a million dollars a year. In fact, the proposal would increase the tax rate by four percentage points. The higher rate would not apply to the first $1 million in income.
    • A story and interview segment from August 3, 2015, stated that a deadline for ballot initiative petitions in Massachusetts was Thursday, August 6th. The deadline is Wednesday, August 5th.
    • A story from July 21, 2015, featured an inaccurate web headline. It said Congressman Neal “would” vote against federal funds if western and central Massachusetts don’t get their share of infrastructure improvements. It should have said Neal would consider voting against the funds.
    • A story and interview segment from July 15, 2015, misspelled the last name of the editor of the Fitchburg Sentinel & Enterprise. It should be Charlie St. Amand, not St. Armand.
    • A story from July 13, 2015, incorrectly stated that the intended target of a Massachusetts terror suspect was a college “cafeteria.” That’s not clear from court documents.
    • During a local newscast in All Things Considered on July 8, 2015, we incorrectly said a new Connecticut law allows local election officials to use the state’s online voter registration system. That had already been allowed. The new law allows the online system to be used to enroll new voters who are registering on Election Day.
    • During a local newscast in Morning Edition on June 30, 2015, we mistakenly said Boston 2024 released its revised Olympic bid “today.” We should have said “yesterday.”
    • A story posted on NEPR.net on June 17, 2015 misspelled Bob Caret’s name. It also misidentified him as the UMass Board president. He is the university president.
    • During a local newscast in Morning Edition on June 5, 2015, we incorrectly said the Connecticut state budget had passed the legislature “yesterday.” The budget actually passed on June 3, 2015.
    • A story posted on NEPR.net on June 4, 2015, that had not yet aired on the radio incorrectly stated that the chikungunya virus is not lethal. It should have said the virus is rarely lethal.
    • A story from May 15, 2015, about a visit to the Holyoke Soldiers’ Home by members of the F-22 Raptor team incorrectly located Westover Air Reserve Base in Westfield, Mass. It is in Chicopee.
    • In a story from May 13, 2015, about the heroin crisis leading to an increase in the number of grandparents taking custody of their grandchildren, we misidentified one such grandmother, Michelle Howe, as Michelle Howell.
    • In an installment of our Words In Transit series airing May 6, 2015, featuring the personal stories of immigrants and refugees, we incorrectly stated that the disastrous Haitian earthquake occurred in 2011. It was in 2010.