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Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont promotes a weeklong sales tax holiday on clothing

Jessica Hill
/
AP

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont hopes this week’s sales tax holiday will boost retail sales. He’s encouraging residents to shop locally and save on clothing.

The April tax free week, which includes athletic wear, is aimed at increasing traffic at Connecticut malls and retailers, Lamont said. This should help them weather the tough economic times created by the pandemic and the war in Ukraine.
“It’s been tough on the consumer. Inflation is rough. We’ve been trying to make it a little bit easier. So here it is. Sales tax free, any item you want up to $100, so go and buy more than one. I hope that makes a difference,” Lamont said, adding that all state residents should take advantage. “The bus service is free for another few months so it ought to be easier for you to take advantage of this sales tax holiday. I hope that makes a big difference.”
Business is already up, said Stephanie Blozy, owner of Fleet Feet, a West Hartford sporting goods store.
We had a lot of people waiting for us to open at 10 a.m. So we are super excited for the buzz and the energy,” she said.
Her customers are familiar with the annual August back-to-school sales tax-free week, Bozy said. That's the week her store makes the most money. She’d also like the spring event to be held every year.
State officials anticipate that the tax-free week would cost about $4 million in lost sales tax revenue.
Copyright 2022 WSHU. To see more, visit WSHU.

As WSHU Public Radio’s award-winning senior political reporter, Ebong Udoma draws on his extensive tenure to delve deep into state politics during a major election year. In addition to providing long-form reports and features for WSHU, he regularly contributes spot news to NPR, and has worked at the NPR National News Desk as part of NPR’s diversity initiative.
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