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Regional News

As Ban Approaches, You Can Turn Over Bump Stocks To Vermont State Police

In this Feb. 1, 2013 file photo - taken at North Raleigh Guns in Raleigh, N.C. - a bump stock is placed near a disassembled .22-caliber rifle. Bump stocks will be banned in Vermont effective Oct. 1. People can voluntarily turn over bump stocks to the VSP.
In this Feb. 1, 2013 file photo - taken at North Raleigh Guns in Raleigh, N.C. - a bump stock is placed near a disassembled .22-caliber rifle. Bump stocks will be banned in Vermont effective Oct. 1. People can voluntarily turn over bump stocks to the VSP.

On Oct. 1, it will be illegal in Vermont to possess bump stocks — a device that attaches to a semi-automatic weapon to speed up the rate it fires.

And starting Monday, Sept. 17, the Vermont State Police will accept bump stocks from residents who voluntarily turn them over.

The ban on bump stocks was one of several gun control measures signed into law by Gov. Phil Scott earlier this year.

State Police Capt. Timothy Clouatre said residents can turn in the devices to any Vermont State Police barracks.

"The only thing we ask is that people don't show up at a barracks with a weapon itself, but just the bump-fire stock removed from the weapon," Clouatre said. "And they can turn that in anonymously and voluntarily, Monday through Friday between 8 and 4."

Clouatre said once the ban takes effect, there will be a price to pay for possessing bump stocks.

"A person who violates this section shall be in prison not more than a year and fined $1,000, or both," Clouatre said. "Right now, voluntary compliance is the preferred method, and like I said, we want to give people the option and the means to do this."

Clouatre said any bump stocks will be dismantled and disposed of by the state's forensic lab.

Copyright 2018 Vermont Public Radio

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