Frankie Graziano

Frankie Graziano joined CPBN in October of 2011 as a sports producer. In addition to reporting for WNPR, Graziano produces feature profiles for CPTV and the web.

Since October of 2011, Graziano has been the lead producer for over 1,200 hours of sports content. CPTV Sports specialized in covering Connecticut’s best high school games and giving Connecticut student-athletes the platform to tell their story. Graziano also produced games outside of CIAC, including WNBA Basketball games and New Britain Rock Cats Baseball.

Graziano created what he touts as Connecticut’s only multi-sport poll to determine a true statewide high school student-athlete of the week in October of 2014. Each week, he scours the state to determine the top six performances by local players. Voting begins Saturday at 6 p.m. and ends Monday at 6 p.m. Over 80 UChoose Student-Athlete of the Week winners have been crowned from 50 different towns since that time. 300,000-plus votes have been cast in that time in support of Connecticut student-athletes.

In addition to producing games, Frankie has done it all at CPTV from coordinating on-air traffic to providing play-by-play commentary. He has called numerous CIAC Championship soccer games. He has been acknowledged twice with awards from the Connecticut Soccer Coaches Association for outstanding coverage of High School Soccer.

Frankie, born Francesco Graziano Jr. in Torrington, Connecticut, is the proud son of Rosa Maria and Francesco Sr. His parents emigrated from Italy 40 years ago. He is married to Colleen Graziano, APRN. Besides his love for Colleen and his family, he deeply adores sports and talking. He had always hoped he would cover sports--never wanting to work in any other field.

In 2011, he graduated from the University of Connecticut. He graduated with a 3.56 cumulative GPA and a bachelor’s degree in two fields—journalism and history. While in college, Graziano interned at WFSB under two men he admires as his mentors—Joe Zone and John Holt. He appeared on various shows at UCTV (UConn’s student television station) and spent his summers covering the Torrington Titans collegiate baseball team.

Longtime Wethersfield Police Chief James Cetran has been fired.

Wethersfield’s town council Tuesday night approved the decision of Town Manager Gary Evans to terminate the embattled chief in a 6-1 vote that came at the end of a six-hour hearing.

Saturday will mark five years since the Pulse nightclub mass shooting in Orlando, Florida.

Among those killed in the early morning of June 12, 2016, was Torrington High School graduate Kimberly “KJ” Morris.

Since April 27, eight nooses have been discovered at the construction site of an Amazon warehouse in Windsor. While Amazon and the companies it has hired to build the massive fulfillment site try to find out who’s responsible for the nooses, local Black social justice leaders are criticizing the e-commerce giant’s efforts.

May 26, 1637: The Pequot village at Mistick Fort burns. It’s the latest salvo in a war that has the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribal nations on opposite sides.

Nowadays, there’s a “first light ceremony” to commemorate the attack on the fort, according to Rodney Butler, chairman of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation.

Martin Miller is stepping down from his post as president of New England Public Media.

Miller started at UMass-licensed WFCR in 1995 as the station’s general manager. In the next 26 years, his operation grew into a Western Mass public media network.

The University of Connecticut is looking for a new president.

The Hartford Courant reported Thursday morning that President Thomas Katsouleas will resign, effective June 30. UConn shared his resignation letter, which is actually two months old.

The Yard Goats are back in Hartford.

One day after the guilty verdicts against Derek Chauvin came down in the murder of George Floyd, Connecticut activists took to the streets looking to address people in the suburbs.

Make it five years without a national title for the most decorated women’s college basketball team in America.

The University of Connecticut women’s basketball team -- the top-rated program in the country -- was stunned Friday night in the Final Four of the NCAA Tournament, losing 69-59 to Arizona.

UConn shot poorly and faced some physical defense in the loss, and freshman Paige Bueckers -- the Associated Press national player of the year -- fought hard to get her 18 points.

East Windsor town officials want to know why the future of their casino project is being shoehorned into sports betting legislation.

The University of Connecticut Women’s Basketball team is going to the Final Four for the 13th straight year.

UConn women’s basketball head coach Geno Auriemma has tested positive for COVID-19. The program announced that the Hall of Famer has no symptoms and is now isolating at home. Auriemma has had both of his COVID vaccination shots, but he had only just gotten the second dose five days ago, so he was nine days from being considered fully protected from the virus.

Essential workers infected by the coronavirus want Connecticut’s workers’ compensation system updated to meet their needs.

After years of private negotiations with the two tribal nations who operate casinos in Connecticut, the state has reached an agreement with at least one of them on legalized sports betting.

The state of Connecticut and the Mohegan tribal nation are close to announcing an agreement on expanded gaming.

The deal could include a license to operate sports betting in Connecticut -- once it is legalized.

Police plan to have a massive presence at a demonstration possibly taking place Sunday at the state Capitol in Hartford, anticipating it could be much larger than a typical protest there.

Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun say they won’t build a casino in East Windsor -- for now. The controversial project that united the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes could be the casualty of a bigger plan that involves exclusive rights to operate sports betting in Connecticut.

A text message invitation to bet on the location of next year’s first homicide in Hartford has resulted in a major shakeup within the city’s police department.

Kristen Record, a physics teacher at Bunnell High School in Stratford, says a lot of her students are bailing on school.

Broadcast sports giant ESPN is telling employees that pandemic-related layoffs are coming. In a company memo sent to NPR, Jimmy Pitaro, chairman, ESPN and sports content, revealed that 300 people would lose their jobs. He also said 200 open positions will be eliminated.

A video featuring a police encounter with a Black person -- this time a Hartford woman -- is again highlighting the tense relationship between law enforcement and the communities it serves.

Union officials are raising concerns that retail giant Amazon is unnecessarily exposing Connecticut residents to COVID-19 -- as well as taking jobs they believe should go to local workers.

State Republican lawmakers say Gov. Ned Lamont shouldn’t have extended his emergency powers under the pandemic for five more months.

A viral video of UConn students at a recent campus dorm party brought a swift rebuke from the university. But both the party itself and the school’s official response are raising more questions about whether students should be back at school.

Some of the more controversial aspects of police reform that’ve been debated on the streets of Connecticut are now law.

In a glimpse of the sporting “new normal,” Connecticut’s top pro soccer club hosted a league game in the middle of a pandemic.

Hartford Athletic held its home opener at Dillon Stadium, four months after it was supposed to be played.

Connecticut’s Department of Education says that state COVID-19 data will guide the decision-making process regarding how K-12 students should learn in the fall, but Thursday's numbers inched in the wrong direction:  The state reported 101 new positive COVID-19 test results and an uptick in the number of hospitalizations by two.

In his resignation letter submitted to the Wethersfield Police Department, Layau Eulizier Jr. wrote that he never thought the day he shot and killed 18-year-old Anthony Jose Vega Cruz would be his last on active patrol in Wethersfield.

The officer who shot and killed a Wethersfield teenager after an April 2019 traffic stop has voluntarily resigned from that town’s police department.

Connecticut’s two casinos are taking paying customers for the first time in two months.

Tribal leadership shuttered the casinos March 18 for the first time in their history over fears of the spread of COVID-19.

Pages