Jay Price

Jay Price is the military and veterans affairs reporter for North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC.

He specialized in covering the military for nearly a decade and traveled four times each to Iraq and Afghanistan for the N&O and its parent company, McClatchy Newspapers. He spent most of 2013 as the Kabul bureau chief for McClatchy.

Price’s other assignments have included covering the aftermaths of Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana and Mississippi and a series of deadly storms in Haiti.

He was a fellow at the Knight Medical Evidence boot camp at MIT in 2012 and the California Endowment’s Health Journalism Fellowship at USC in 2014.

He was part of a team that was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize for its work covering the damage in the wake of Hurricane Floyd, and another team that won the Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalists for a series of reports on the private security contractor Blackwater. 

He has reported from Asia, Latin America, and Europe and written free-lance stories for The Baltimore Sun, Outside magazine and Sailing World.

Price is a North Carolina native and UNC-Chapel Hill graduate. He lives with his wife and daughter in Chapel Hill.

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In Lumber Bridge, N.C., population 98, a long lost son came home. First Lieutenant James "Dick" Wright was buried this week, and his World War II heroism was honored. Jay Price of member station WUNC reports.

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Updated July 22, 2021 at 8:03 AM ET

Maj. Melissa Elledge deployed to combat zones twice in earlier versions of body armor designed for a male-centric Army, so she's deeply familiar with their failings for women. The bad fit created potentially lethal gaps at the arm openings and left the heavy ceramic plates resting on her legs, cutting off circulation as she sat in trucks or aircraft.

The red-cockaded woodpecker has been listed as endangered for more than half a century, but that could soon change.

In the final months of the Trump administration, federal wildlife officials started a process to downgrade its status to "threatened."

Conservation groups say science doesn't support the move, and that it could undermine gains made in part with the help of unusual public-private partnerships that have taken decades of work and millions of dollars.

Copyright 2020 North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC. To see more, visit North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC.

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At a picturesque national cemetery inside a volcanic crater above Honolulu, crews with shovels and backhoes are digging up hundreds of long-nameless U.S. dead from the Korean War and turning them over to a nearby Pentagon lab for identification.

The massive disinterment project is giving hope to thousands of aging family members that they may finally know what happened to missing fathers, brothers, husbands, and uncles.