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Labor shortage: New England businesses can’t find workers to fill abundance of job openings

Black-Eyed Sally’s in downtown Hartford, Connecticut, faces staffing shortages, among other businesses.
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Courtesy Black-Eyed Sally's
Black-Eyed Sally’s in downtown Hartford, Connecticut, faces staffing shortages, among other businesses.

And Another Thing dives into the contributing factors that have led to the drastic decline in available workers. Is it the job or the wages?

And the problem doesn’t stop at labor shortages. The ongoing disruption to the global supply chain has had a trickle-down effect on industries from trucking to restaurants. We hear from a Hartford staple on its challenge to find wait staff.

You may not be a truck driver, and perhaps you think you can handle slower service at a restaurant, but the delays from these industries affect our day to day routines in ways we may not think about.

And Another Thing speaks with Whitman-Hanson Regional High School athletic director Bob Rodgers on how the bus driver shortage is affecting transportation for his athletics teams.

Also on the show, president of trucking job search company CDLJobs.com, Darin Williams, explains how if there are no truck drivers, the goods we rely on every day may not make it to the shelves in our grocery stores.

Guests:

  • Darin Williams, president of CDLJobs.com
  • Bob Rodgers, Whitman-Hanson High School athletic director 
  • Kenneth Glasser, Global Sourcing Contracts manager
  • James Varano, owner of Black-Eyed Sally’s in Hartford

This episode was originally broadcast on November 4, 2021.

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