© 2022 New England Public Media

FCC public inspection files:
WGBYWFCRWNNZWNNUWNNZ-FMWNNI

For assistance accessing our public files, please contact hello@nepm.org or call 413-781-2801.
NEPM Header Banner
PBS. NPR. Local Perspective.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Regional News

Attorney for Chicopee Schools Superintendent Lynn Clark 'disappointed' client was arrested by FBI

Attorney Jared Olanoff stands with his client, suspended Superintendent of Chicopee Schools Lynn Clark, on the steps of federal court in Springfield, Massachusetts.
Elizabeth Román
/
NEPM
Attorney Jared Olanoff stands with his client, suspended Superintendent of Chicopee Schools Lynn Clark, on the steps of federal court in Springfield, Massachusetts.

An attorney for embattled Chicopee, Massachusetts, Superintendent of Schools Lynn Clark said his client is denying the allegations in an FBI affidavit.

Clark, who was arrested at her home on Wednesday, is charged with making false statements to the FBI about threatening text messages sent to a candidate for the city's police chief.

According to the affidavit, Chicopee Mayor John Vieau contacted the FBI in December after the candidate withdrew from consideration for the position.

Clark's attorney, Jared Olanoff, said the information in the affidavit was obtained when Clark voluntarily spoke to the FBI without a lawyer.

"There are some problems with it, some inaccuracies. There are some things in there that the FBI alleges she said, that she denies she ever said," Olanoff said, including an allegation that she blamed her son for the text messages.

Clark is currently on paid leave from the district. She appeared on the steps of federal court in Springfield on Friday with Olanoff, who said the pretrial publicity has caused enormous damage to his client's reputation.

"I'm also disappointed that Ms. Clark was arrested and handcuffed and brought out of her home," he said "That did not have to happen."

Olanoff said Clark has been with the school district for 29 years first as a teacher, then a principal for 14 years before becoming an assistant superintendent and finally superintendent two years ago.

Olanoff asked the public to keep an open mind as the case proceeds.

"This happens. People are charged with crimes every day. Not everyone who is charged with a crime is guilty," he said.

Related Content