Howard Weiss-Tisman

Howard Weiss-Tisman is VPR's southern Vermont correspondent.

A pop-up testing site for the new coronavirus was set up in Manchester Wednesday. This comes after more than 40 people tested positive for COVID-19 at the local urgent care clinic earlier this week.

Over the weekend, Gov. Phil Scott ordered all Vermont schools closed starting this Wednesday until at least April 6, and possibly much longer. And on Monday, schools were tying up loose ends and preparing the students, families and staff for this strange new normal.

When the town of Brattleboro put up a Civil War monument more than a hundred years ago, it didn’t include the black soldiers who served in that war. Now some local students want to change that.

The Brattleboro Retreat says it doesn't have enough money to finish a 12-bed expansion that's underway. The recent announcement that the state won't add any more funding to the project is putting more pressure on the financially-strapped hospital.

The Brattleboro Museum and Art Center has an ambitious plan to try to raise $30 million for an expansion. The museum is partnering with developers who want to include 24 high-end apartments on the top floors of the new building.

All of this comes as online shopping continues to dig into local sales and challenge what a vibrant economy looks like.

The company that's tearing down the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant hopes to use its experience to bid on similar jobs around the country.  To do that, it's got to get the decommissioning process right in Vermont. 

From the start, news of a possible merger between Marlboro College and the University of Bridgeport stirred mixed feelings on campus and in town. Some worried the tiny liberal arts college would lose its identity; others said it was a reasonable solution to a challenging financial situation.

But now that the merger is off everyone is wondering what's next.

Back in the day communities all over Vermont had their own town dump, basically holes in the ground where people could just get rid of whatever garbage they were able to haul over.

But the politics and the economics of solid waste have changed — and Vermont's last unlined landfill, in Salisbury, closed on Sept. 1.

On the weekend marking the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, at least two Vermont towns will be holding their first-ever pride parades.

There’s still some uncertainty around the federal and the state rules that regulate hemp — but as the market for CBD oil grows, there’s a lot of anticipation around what a good hemp crop could mean for Vermont’s economy.

Lawmakers were hoping to begin testing the water at Vermont schools and daycare centers for lead this academic year. But as lawmakers are having a tough time deciding what level of lead triggers remediation and how much state money to put toward the work, it looks unlikely testing can start before school lets out in June.

Southern Vermont College, in Bennington, announced Monday that it will be closing at the end of the spring semester. The college's president, David Evans, made the announcement in a press release sent out Monday morning.

The partial federal government shutdown is slowing business projects in Vermont.

A bookstore owner in Brattleboro is donating books to the Police Department for individuals who have to spend the night locked up, waiting to be arraigned.

The Vermont Attorney General's Office announced Monday that it found "no criminal misconduct" following a five-year investigation of the Brattleboro Retreat, a mental health treatment facility in southern Vermont.

An economic development organization in Wilmington is offering $20,000 to the entrepreneur who comes up with the best business plan and is able to open up a new store in the downtown area.

A man suspected of robbing numerous convenience stores now faces federal charges. Mark Triolo, 46, of Texas, remains hospitalized after police shot him in Brattleboro Friday night.

Vermont's U.S. Attorney says Brattleboro Memorial Hospital allegedly submitted bills to Medicare and Medicaid without the proper documentation.

The School for International Training will be slashing staff at its campus in Brattleboro.

SIT opened in 1964 and was one of the first schools to stress international learning with a focus on overseas travel and study.

This week's extreme weather tested the state's shelter system for the homeless.

The first municipal waterline extensions to homes contaminated with the chemical PFOA have been installed. State officials were in Bennington Monday marking the important milestone.

Vermont Rail System is storing tanker cars filled with propane near a residential neighborhood in Bennington, and some of the people who live nearby are wondering what they can do to ensure their safety.

The U.S. Forest Service is collecting public input on a plan to increase the fees at developed campgrounds in the Green Mountain National Forest.

Bennington residents who have been dealing with contaminated water are starting to get frustrated with the state's ability to find a long-term solution to their problem.