Ryan Lindsay

Ryan Lindsay has been asking questions since she figured how to say her first few words. She eventually figured out that journalism is the profession where you can and should always ask questions.

While an undergraduate at Northwestern, Ryan worked as a local reporter in Topeka, KS, and reported for the Medill Justice Project, formerly known as the Medill Innocence Project. While at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, she covered arts, culture and criminal justice in Oakland for The East Bay Express and Oakland North. She has also freelanced for The Athletic Bay Area, covering the on & off-the-court lives of Golden State Warriors players. Through the Prison University Project, Ryan taught journalism & storytelling to students at San Quentin State Prison.

Black Lives Matter murals have been popping up across the country since the killing of George Floyd by police. In Hartford, a mural is tucked away in the city’s North End, with another in the works downtown. And in Stamford, the affirmation Black Lives Matter has been painted on a main street.

Despite protests from community members and a proposal from two of its members to cut $9.6 million from the police budget, the Hartford city council voted Wednesday night for a $2 million reduction and reallocation of police funds. 

Drive-through coronavirus testing centers in Hartford have been active for nearly two months, but many North End residents don’t have cars or rely on public transportation to get around. And other barriers, like a lack of health insurance or a doctor’s referral prevented others from getting tested for the disease.

Hartford HealthCare has launched a mobile coronavirus testing program in partnership with the city of Hartford that will make it easier to bring testing to people who need it.

The state reported an additional 41 coronavirus-related deaths Sunday, but it also reported that hospitalizations due to COVID-19 have decreased for the second day in a row.

The new figures bring the state’s total coronavirus-associated death count to 1,127. Still, Gov. Ned. Lamont said Sunday that the slight downward tick of hospitalized patients -- 37 fewer patients from the day before -- is a positive sign.

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont signed an executive order on Saturday establishing COVID-19 recovery centers in some nursing homes, a move that creates places for patients who’ve been discharged from the hospital to continue to recover. 

For many Jewish families, staying safe and staying home because of the coronavirus meant that this year's Passover dinner took place using technology.

This post has been updated.

After suggesting earlier in the day that much of the Northeast’s tri-state region could soon be subject to an “enforceable” quarantine, President Donald Trump abruptly reversed course Saturday night.

As the Department of Transportation continues to make adjustments to CTtransit service and policies, some bus operators feel as though they’re still at risk of carrying or contracting the coronavirus.

As Connecticut’s food and drink industry implements new rules and regulations to mitigate the spread of coronavirus, many are finding creative ways to stay in business.

Saturday marked seven years since the Sandy Hook Elementary School mass shooting that left 20 students and six educators dead. And, as a town came together to remember and to pray in the morning, it also came together to celebrate an unlikely football victory by night’s end. 

The state of Connecticut announced Tuesday that it plans to divest from its investments in civilian gun manufacturers -- the latest move in a state that has enacted stricter gun policies since the Newtown massacre.

Infowars founder Alex Jones.
MICHAEL ZIMMERMANN / Creative Commons

Infowars founder Alex Jones has lost another legal battle against families who lost loved ones in the Sandy Hook Elementary School mass shooting.

A group of teens from the Greater Hartford area spent their summer talking about and brainstorming solutions to gun violence within their communities. The Summer Youth Leadership Academy presented their solutions this week to city officials, community members and law enforcement under four umbrellas: accountability, preventing violence between youth, rehabilitation, and changing our violent culture.

Following multiple fatal shootings in Hartford last week, Mothers United Against Violence is holding a series of vigils to honor the victims. They've been organized to give the community an opportunity to grieve, come together and be encouraged.

A bill that establishes new standards for police seeking mental health care and also new rules for law enforcement accountability is set to become law in Connecticut soon, after passing the General Assembly this session. 

The Hartford Police Department has begun rolling out body cams to its officers to use on a daily basis. Using a combination of state grant money and funding from the city, the department purchased 325 cameras. The cameras, supporting equipment, and some cloud storage space came from Axon, a company that started out making tasers in the 1990s. Since the launch of its pilot program in February, officers have recorded more than 12,000 videos with the body-worn cameras.

The state’s attorney investigating the fatal Wethersfield, Conn. police shooting said she wants to go back to the beginning of the traffic stop and understand why police pulled over 18-year-old Anthony Jose “Chulo” Vega Cruz.

Nearly two weeks since a Wethersfield police officer shot an 18-year-old driver after a traffic stop, the chief state’s attorney’s office released dashcam footage and surveillance video on Friday that show the incident that led to the man’s death.

The shooting death of 18-year-old Anthony Jose "Chulo" Vega Cruz by a Wethersfield police officer prompted protesters to take to the streets of Hartford and Wethersfield Thursday night.

A Wethersfield teen has died after being shot during a traffic stop in the town. State police confirmed the death of 18-year-old Anthony Jose Vega Cruz Monday night. 

The call that came during the wee hours of the morning of March 24 was from a man in Enfield. He said he wanted to burn the Muhammad Islamic Center of Greater Hartford, using the n-word and other slurs against the members of the mosque that serves African-American, refugee, and immigrant Muslims.

After months of silence, the Connecticut Supreme Court reinstated a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the families of nine victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting against Remington Arms, the manufacturer of the rifle used in the shooting. 

As the month-marker of the partial government shutdown approaches, Transportation Security Administration employees at Bradley International Airport are turning to food donations to keep meals on their table.

Before the Hartford Reentry Welcome Center opened, people in the city fresh out of prison didn’t have one central place where they could find housing, counseling or even a clean, safe place to use the bathroom. Now, they do. The center - located in City Hall -  is a partnership between Community Partners in Action, the City of Hartford, the Department of Corrections and more than 40 local organizations.